Tag: mental illlness

Is an Unconscious Fear of Money Stunting Your Creative Business?

Is an Unconscious Fear of Money Stunting Your Creative Business?

The hardest part of creative entrepreneurship for me is the entrepreneurship of it all. I know it’s that way for a lot of creatives who are trying to make their art their full time job. I feel like if you love writing, art, film, music, etc., and think of yourself as a writer, artist, director, musician, etc., that making money from it should be something you’re always striving towards. For me, making a living doing what I love would be the definition of happiness.

Making Money, Two-Fold

In my experience there’s two pieces that stand in our way when we’re first starting out.

The first, and most time-consuming, is learning the fine print of business. “Business” here means the blanket basics like marketing/analytics and the nitty gritty of whatever tools you plan on using. This is the in-between period after seeing one of your peers successfully making money off their craft & trying to emulate it and before you yourself are at the same level of success.
 
That piece is where Google comes in. Everything you need to know about running your business is online and most of it is free. 
 
For me, that isn’t the hardest part. Don’t get me wrong, it is HARD. There is so much trial and error. But personally, I love research and learning. I like sorting my to do list and deciding what’s important for my creative work right now. I guess it’s because I can totally push something out of my brain. “Sure I’ll buy that service instead of MacGyver-ing an incredibly time-consuming work around, after I sell x amount of x and can afford it.”
 
Buuuuut it’s right there where I hit a snag. Selling. Making money. Just the very CONCEPT of it. That’s part two. It comes with a lot of emotions, feelings and other mushy stuff us creatives deal with.

Complex Feelings about Money (and the people who have it)

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5 YA Authors Reveal Their Writing Process + A Discussion on Fear

5 YA Authors Reveal Their Writing Process + A Discussion on Fear

Scroll down for author processes + a downloadable PDF w/ more of their writing advice ♥

In the fall of 2015 I attended the very first Nerdcon: Stories in Minneapolis, MN. The convention basically catered to two types of attendees: the fan and the creator. It very much wanted the people who came into the convention center as fans to leave as creators, and the creators to become fans of not only their fellow creators but of their own fans.

Creator, Fan, Both, Neither?

I was at a very weird crossroads in my life where going into the con I wasn’t really either fan or creator.

Once I had been a huge fan of John and Hank Green, who were the masterminds behind this gathering. It was 2015 when I started drifting away from the nerdfighter community for various reasons. Let’s say I was…at odds with one of the Vlog Brothers at the time and the communities treatment of their audience. 

I love these people! I am actually in this, waaaay in the back recording Hank’s singing next to a pillar away from the anxiety of the crowd. Image from the official NerdCon twitter.

So, not exactly a fan of some of the “big name” special guests. I was definitely star struck by Mara Wilson, it’s always nice to see Lev Grossman, and the energy is always great at these things. The HPA 10 year anniversary gave me all the feels. I came away with a to-read list taller than I am, from all the great authors I heard speak but didn’t know about before hand. Not to mention, I became pretty much obsessed with every performer to grace the stage.

Every other con I had attended before this one, I at least always thought of myself as a creator. I was a YouTuber. Not just any YouTuber but a BookTuber. I was sent free books, I had an upload schedule, I had thousands of subscribers, I was a proper creator.

In the fall of 2015 to early 2016 I was struggling against the storm of a reddit community who didn’t like the content I was making. That makes it sound way more benign than it was, and I’ve talked about ways to avoid it, but long story short: I was scared. I struggled against my instinct to stop creating (not just YouTube, but everything) and my urge to create. The instinct to stop was largely winning.

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THIS ISN’T NORMAL: Trump, Ableism, and History

THIS ISN’T NORMAL: Trump, Ableism, and History

Last Thursday, during the Morning Joe debacle, Don Lemmon opened his show by saying this:

“I have heard and said the phrase ‘This is not normal’ so many times and I’m sick of hearing it and I’m sick of saying it.”

At least one Donny with a history of lying is actually speaking the truth these days. I wholeheartedly agree with his statement, but it doesn’t make the phrase less importantly urgent.

It seems as if every day there’s another Republican begrudgingly flipping over to the side who agrees that this is not a normal presidency. I’m not talking “of course it’s not normal, it’s better” kind of statements here either. These right-wing politicians are talking about their president like kids at my middle school talked about lil ol’ neurodivergant me, like he’s the weird kid in the back of the room mumbling about other dimensions and eating paper. Now of course when talking about myself I say something along the lines of “of course I’m not normal, I’m better,” but once again that is not what’s happening in Washington. Whether Trump and I share any diagnosis does not matter because when we say “normal” we are not talking about what the more bigoted members of our society perceive as “normal.”

We are talking about history and we are talking about humanity. We’re talking about what is happening to our country, something that could not be happening if we simply had a “mentally ill” person in the white house. This is especially true since his supporters are the aforementioned more bigoted members of our society who voted with ableism in their hearts anyway.

Keep on reading!